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Dec. 19, 2022

Dave bought a mac mini: moving your podcast to a new machine

Dave bought a mac mini:  moving your podcast  to a new machine

Today's is a little more hardware-related (and Jim get's his nerd on BIG TIME) as Dave has bought a Mac Mini, and Jim has some great advice about moving to a new machine.  JOIN THE SCHOOL OF PODCASTING Join the School of Podcasting worry-free...


Today's is a little more hardware-related (and Jim get's his nerd on BIG TIME) as Dave has bought a Mac Mini, and Jim has some great advice about moving to a new machine. 

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Jim Steps For Migrating to a New Computer
1. Get rid of bloatware
2. Get the updates
3. Get familiar with the operating system
4. Run both systems for a while
5. Do you install Antivirus?
6. Backing up your computer
7. What do you do with your old PC?

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Mentioned In This Episode

Featured supporter: Indie Drop In Network

Synergy Software to share a mouse over two computers

Backblaze Backup Your Computer

Cigar Authority Podcast

TOPICS and TIMELINE

2:52 The plot to every Christmas special.
 
6:28 What to do with your old hard drive.
 
10:51 How to get familiar with the operating system.
 
16:01 The magic word: learning curve.
 
20:22 What to do if you don’t have any virus.
 
24:43 Dave’s storage strategy.
 
29:33 What do you do with your old pc right now?
 
34:13 Do you have a problem outing a company?
 
39:26 The importance of visibility for brands that affiliate with a show that may be safe but the host is not.
 
43:43 What is errors and omissions insurance?
 
49:03 What’s the consensus on fellow podcasters who reach out to be on your podcast?
 
53:30 How to get on other people’s podcasts.
 
59:16 When you get a high-profile guest on your show, it makes it easier to get other guests.
 
1:03:56 The only time I ever get slightly upset is if somebody bumps me twice.
 
1:09:49 You never know who will agree to be on your show until you ask.
 
1:14:56 Is this type of podcast needed or not?
 
1:21:39 How Bruce Springsteen reinvented himself in the 80s.
 
Dave Garoppolo’s business model.

 

 


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Podchaser - Ask the Podcast Coach

 

Transcript

David Jackson  
Ask the podcast coach for December 17 2022. Let's get ready to podcast. There it is that music. That means Saturday morning. It's time for Ask the podcast coach where you get your podcast questions answered. Live. I'm Dave Jackson from the School of podcasting.com. And today, we're gonna get our Nerd on. Let's definitely that's definitely sure for today. We're also going to talk maybe a little brand safety. When's the best day to publish your podcast? We might cover that it's all based on the chat room and where they want to go. And the guy that's gonna help me wade through that is that guy right over there. You know, and Miss Jim Collison from the average guy.tv Jim, how's it going, buddy?

Jim Collison  
Greetings, Dave. Happy Saturday morning to you snowy blustery. Christmas feels like morning. So welcome to the week before Christmas. But for those who don't know, you have a week till Christmas. Yeah, good movie,

David Jackson  
you better go get your stuff or for those of us whose family go out of town. This is Christmas weekend. I'm doing Christmas tomorrow because my most of my family goes to Florida to hang out with in laws and things of that nature. So if you are new to the show, where to ask the podcast coach.com/live That's where the YouTube chat room is. And if you want to go to ask the podcast coach.com/join You can jump right into the video. But before we do that, we should probably get your pour on. And of course, that pour is brought to you by our friend Mark over at podcast branding.co If you he said hitting the button, if you need artwork, you know for your podcast. I've used him for the podcast radio show, the School of podcasting logo, ask the podcast coach, Mark is not only a great graphic artists, but he's also podcaster. So that whole, I have to explain what a podcast thing is, goes right out the window. In fact, if you had to watch you don't, you could because Mark's gonna sit down with you one on one to really understand your brand. And make sure that you know the artwork he's designing fits in with kind of the vibe of your show, probably going to listen to an episode or two. He really goes the extra mile that you're just not going to get from a guy on Fiverr and it's going to look great. Now if you need a lead magnet or a full website or a branding kind of audit, he can do that too. Everything is there at podcast branding.co. And I always make this joke but it's true. He's Canadian, and he's going to be polite. So check him out podcast branding.co

Jim Collison  
So good to have a coffee in the morning. Big thanks, Dan love Feb over there based on a true story podcast that based on a true story podcast.com New episode out to 20 the man who invented Christmas. Dave, are you telling me an American invented Christmas? It wasn't Santa. Since the beginning of

David Jackson  
your mouth? That's blasphemy?

Jim Collison  
Well, you can you can find out. It's over on the site right now, based on a true story. podcast.com. Dan, thanks for your sponsorship.

David Jackson  
And just a thought for anybody thinking about should I start a podcast? Do you realize the plot to every Christmas special is? Wait, Christmas is canceled? That's the plot of every Oh my, what are we going to do? There's there's that. So also, if you're listening to us on the wisdom app, if you click the little button beneath my blinking head, that will request you to come up on the stage. We'll be happy to take your question that way as well. But first, of course, and now.

Unknown Speaker  
He's been waiting for this. It's time for Jim to get his nerd on.

David Jackson  
It's it's I love the kids. It's good to get your nerd on or have a nerd because Dave Santa came early for Dave. That's right. It's a Mac Mini still in the paper. haven't unboxed it yet because as I mentioned, crashed for me. Yeah.

Jim Collison  
How long have you had that Dave Jackson

David Jackson  
that showed up yesterday? And I went okay, all right, I'll catch you. Then I went, if I open that, my I'm done. I'm just like, I'm gonna go, I'm gonna get stuck. And instead, I went down many rabbit holes on hubs and docks. And then the whole thing is, if you get some sort of dock with an HDMI port, does it do 4k At 60 hertz not 30 And I was like, wait a minute, most videos are 24 frames per second. Why do we need but then it's not frames per second. It's hertz and I was like, I don't know I need a nerd. And I know

Jim Collison  
you've you know this podcast with on Saturday when I think you're are actually better in the initial setup of this thing, I think you're better off. And for most podcasters, this would be my advice, especially if you're on a Mac Mini, just set it up on one monitor. So don't try to do the tool the to monitor off of the off the Mac, you can, I went ultra wide, so I get that extra space, but you can do a single monitor on it. And I don't necessarily know if I'd buy the dock right away, I think I would set it up, get rolling. Figure out if you actually need it. Like there may be some things you can do differently that I'd invest in harddrive space as opposed to a dock. But there's yeah, there's just some things you can do, you can think about. And then keep your Windows box, set that on a second monitor. And there's some there's a program called synergy that you can use one keyboard and one mouse across both Mac and PC. And so it allows you to kind of have both up as you're making the transition because you're going to spend a bunch of time transitioning these computers, right?

David Jackson  
Yeah, one of the things I'm going to be doing is I noticed as I looked at my PC, and the fact one of the reasons is probably running out of hard drive space, is I'm not doing a very good job of cleanup. So for me, I will download all the files from the road caster, which I need maybe two or three, instead, I get like five. And I'm not going back after it's done and deleting the files I don't need because I use Hindenburg. And what Hindenburg does is it makes its own folder, like when you're done the Hindenburg folder is everything you need anything else you could delete. And so I know there's a bunch of hard drive space that I could clean up with that. And I have a tone of, you know, musicians, coolers files, which is a podcast that's been dead for about a decade at this point. And I don't want to delete it. But I know there's a service from Backblaze that's made for backing up stuff that you probably should throw away. And it's like dirt cheap. And I thought rather than you know taking up more space on it, even if it's a you know, external hard drive, I'm like, I just need to throw it in the cloud. Because I'm always like, oh, there's that stuff that I should probably throw away and getting rid of that. So but you the fun thing is originally I thought I was actually thinking of taking my PC, moving it to the living room, which meant buying another desk, buying another monitor for the the Mac and then today I woke up and I was like, you know, really, I've two monitors here. And I thought I rarely I'm not the kind of guy that's doing video where I have one program taking up both screens. It's usually, you know, Dave School of podcasting stuff on left monitor, lips and stuff in Firefox on the right, and I'm like, we're just going to swap it out instead of being things in Firefox. On the right for Lipson, I'll just do you know, maybe I'll do my lips and stuff on my PC, and do all my podcasting stuff on the Mac. So that is the plan. And then I thought about that before I go buying a hub. A, because one of the things that's cool about these hubs is you can add additional hard drives. And I was like, Okay, that's cool. But I also thought before I go blowing another 100 bucks. Let's see if we need it. You know, and because I was really worried about the dual monitor thing, and I was like, Well wait a minute, if I'm not really using a dual monitor with one program, I was like, let's just put the PC on this one of the Mac on that one. And yeah, we'll go to town, it's,

Jim Collison  
it's a great way to transition. So keep your keep your Windows PC and monitor that, excuse me in the monitor that use the most often. Because there's a lot of muscle memory in this in what you do with a computer, right brain muscle memory, where you're used to looking for things or finding things, whatever. So sorry, leave that main monitor in front of you, PC, then take the monitor out of the PC, plug it into the Mac, you'll need a separate keyboard to get things started. So keyboard and mouse on the Mac, you'll need you'll need to borrow one or find one or whatever make that work. But so get them both up and running separately, right? And give yourself some time that way. You're not like some people make this huge mistake. They're like I'm throwing it in the studio today. And you're like, probably not a great idea. Get that thing set up. Because there's some steps you're going to need to do. Dave, I'm going to walk you through a few of these. But there's some steps you need to do before you really move that thing into production. And then once it's kind of set up, and you've got you've got it the way you like it, then you can switch it or leave it doesn't matter. You can do whatever you want. Right? That's that's the beauty of it. Yeah. So let's talk a little bit about that. When you when you do unbox it and you're not going to unbox it on the air here. So they're crying for that in the chat room. unbox it Dave.

David Jackson  
Here's what's in it, the Mac Mini and a power cord. That's it.

Jim Collison  
Yeah, it's not it's not necessarily that exciting. But so for those of you who at Christmas time are getting a new PC or maybe a Mac. There's not a lot of the set of Mac but after the initial setup right So we talked about that how to get that setup set up as some separate, you got to kind of D bloat the system. Now, the Mac doesn't have a lot of bloatware, if any, I don't think it has very much on it at all. But our PC friends, those come with a tow manner, right? So you got to kind of go through uninstall some things to get, just get some stuff, figured out, delete some things, get familiar with what's there, and then take it out. And then you'll need to do this on both PC and Mac. Regardless of what you have, start your updates. This is why you don't unbox it and then just try to go right to production. Because Dave, you're gonna have some updates, even though that Mac was just shipped from China like a week ago, right? It's still gonna have a bunch of updates on it, right? So you got to kind of sit down, go through, get the updates, rolling, get it out, you know, do its thing. And then I think spend some time getting familiar with the operating system. Dave, you said it's been a while. Right? It's been a while.

David Jackson  
Yeah, I have an old Mac Mini that I only bought. So I could do GarageBand tutorials. That was it. And I did my GarageBand tutorials unplugged, it kind of said, Oh, I'll keep it plugged in. And it's got to be I know, at least two if not three operating systems behind. So eventually, once I get the new Mac Mini plugged in, I am going to turn it off, plug in the old Mac Mini and update the operating system. And in that old Mac Mini is going to church. That's going to be our check in checkout computer. But it's been years. So I know the the chooser and preferences and Yeah, a couple other things. So I always through my whole life, I always end up on a Mac, I'll do something with it. And then I'll move into a new position. And I'll go five, six years without touching a Mac and then want to come along. And so that's exactly where we are now it's been probably five years since I bought that original. And

Jim Collison  
here's the good news in the five years you've been away. Yeah, everything's gone to the browser. Yeah, that's it. Right? Browsers are all the same. When you're in stream yard in the browser, it works just like the same on a Mac as it does on a PC. So I've really gotten to the point, I have a Mac in the middle for me, I have windows to the left windows to the right Mac in the middle. I've kind of set it up so that I don't know the difference. Like I don't think oh, I need to go to the Mac to do this. Right. I it's based on where do I want to do the work? Right? The really the main difference is the color when you close out the the screens, you know, the close it out is in the upper left instead of the upper right, right.

David Jackson  
So here's the question, what Brett like I use, I'm a big chrome guy on my PC. But I also know that anytime things get weird, I go into my task manager and I see where there's 4 million instances of Chrome running even though I only have eight tabs open. I'm like, that's weird. And it seems to take up a lot of things. Is that the same on a Mac? Or should I just go on safari all the time now?

Jim Collison  
It just depends what you want. You want to go with Chrome on Mac is just fine. If whatever you're going to use, use them consistently. This is why Chrome is for why most people are using Chrome across the truth too, because it runs pretty well on both now I'm gonna get some feedback on that from the chat room that use this use brave use the edge you said it nobody ever

David Jackson  
said Yeah, bloatware equals Microsoft Edge.

Jim Collison  
Oh, it's gotten really, it's gotten very bloated. I think the key to this is, of course, you can't run Safari on Windows. So if you want a consistent browser, you're kind of left with either brave or chrome, if you don't want to use edge, those are the three big ones. The the key for me has been to make sure in the browsers, you have the sync turned on, so that the browser's are syncing across and this is the cool thing they'll sync kind of across iOS. So again, it's like you don't even have to think you kind of you don't even have to think about it. So that is your your I think your browser environment is the first thing you get set up. Right, right. As you're getting in there. You're getting things set up, get your browsers because you're gonna need your browser then to download the software and do some of the other things that you're that you're going to do. And I think the Oh, go ahead. Well, Chris

David Jackson  
had a question. Because I found out years ago that Firefox is more of a resource hog than Chrome. Is that still the case? It can be because there are times when I'll be like, I'll be, you know, I'll start swearing at Chrome fire at my task manager and I see that the thing that's really gobbling up my memory is Firefox because I use Firefox for my lips and stuff just to keep things separate. And I'd be like, Oh, well, wait a minute, hold on, you know. So it's, well,

Jim Collison  
it all browsers are actually pretty bad. Yeah. If you're, if you're kind of a resource. You know, if you're watching your resources all the time, and you go so like on Windows, if you go into the right click on the taskbar down below, go to the Task Manager. There's a resource First tab, it'll show you what's using CPU. It's using memory, what's writing to the hard drive? It's alarming like that. Don't do that right before you go to bed because you'll have nightmares about wasted utilization. All night long, right? So all of those, all of them all the browser's are bloated in a lot of ways, especially on PC. Not so much. So on Mac, but it varies from time to time. You know, Chrome, Google Chrome was out the gate. First, they seem to have settled down Microsoft's Edge browser came in you just chromium. So the same engine is Google Chrome. It it was very plain in the beginning. And it was actually kind of nice. Yeah, they've bloated it out. Right? Of course. So yeah, Brave is a nice alternative. They don't spy on you like the other ones do. It's kind of kind of crypto. It's got some weird crypto stuff in it. But, you know, again, it's kind of a learning curve to get up to date on it. Get your browser set

David Jackson  
up next, and you said the magic word learning curve. And that's another reason why I didn't open it up last night, because I just knew I was like, Okay, I'm gonna, but I also know that there's going to be a time when I'm plugging this in, and I get it up and the monitor comes on, I go to do something. And I'm going to be like, Hmm, I think it's here, it's there. And I'm going to be kind of frustrated, because I don't know exactly what to do. And you just have to realize that knowing that going in that, hey, when I'm uncomfortable, or whatever it is, whatever verb your adjective you want to use, that's normal. And it's not going to be forever, I will eventually figure this out and go that route. And well, that's why I

Jim Collison  
like Dave, I like keeping your your setup, your current setup intact. Yeah. First up in running another instance running your Mac right next to it, because it gives you the chance to still continue to work and then and then look over the other PC. Okay, how would I do this? So think about it from a podcast production standpoint. So this week, you're, you're producing your podcasts this weekend, you could have the Mac next to it, then you could be thinking, Okay, I do this for production. How am I going to do this on the Mac? Right, right. So you start you slowly, maybe over the course of a month, you slowly start moving all those processes over? Because there's nothing more frightening than when you've taken a PC down and you can't get back to it. And then you're like, ah, there's a key on there. Right? There was something on there I needed, right? Yeah,

David Jackson  
that's, that's the nice thing about this is opposed to oh, crap, my hard drive failed, my computer's dead. I've got I can make this transition as slow or as fast as I want it. And like you said, I think I'll probably open this Sunday, when I get home from from Christmas, plug it in and let it start doing updates. So and then just from there, you know, but really, a lot of it is going to be cleaning up my PC, and figuring out, you know, who's storing what, and that whole nine yards the program you mentioned, I forget, because I know Dan said he loved it.

Jim Collison  
Keyboard Mouse is called synergy sy n

David Jackson  
and that runs on the PC or the Mac or how does that work? Yes, the

Jim Collison  
answer is both, okay, you, you go to their website, I would purchase their pro version. And then you they have a Mac client, and they have a PC client. And you just download them, run them and then decide which which computer you want your keyboard and mouse to be the kind of the server, right where what's it plugged into. And then you go to the other computers and just point them there. So you can either put in the IP address, or sometimes it just finds it on the network, which is super cool. And it says, Hey, I found this computer do you want to bring it in and it brings up this nine by nine grid that says where do you want the monitor. And so you can place it next to it or above it or below it just kind of depends on what your monitor setup is cool. And then click apply and all of a sudden, your mouse goes across and you can move the mouse now remember, for those using this kind of software, the mouse needs to be in focus on the computer it's being used. So if you take your mouse over to the to the Mac, and you start typing it'll type on the Mac not the PC right that's how it knows where the focus is for you. It's based on the mouse

David Jackson  
again a fun little learning curve there.

Jim Collison  
It's not as bad as it seems. Although sometimes you'll click and then drag your mouse like by mistake and then you'll start typing you're like hey where to where the cursor go? Yeah, like Oh, it's over on the other computer.

David Jackson  
Mele says yeah, don't change from PC to a Mac when there's a deadline looming and then DR is saying getting rid of bloatware is problematic the problem. The program names are so ambiguous. Don't get rid of regnant screwdriver because you need that to run the thing of a bob Then of course the doohickey and you find out later Yeah, exactly.

Jim Collison  
So yeah, with with bloatware know what you're doing. Oftentimes it's sitting there, it's just fine. Like, you could leave it if you don't know it's good, it may be good not to just go mass delete things because you might be removing a driver, you might be, you know, something, something like that, like Dr said something something else seeds, so. Okay, so once Dave, once you get that all set up, you got two important decisions to make. Do I install any virus? Right? I would say yeah, do I do my backups? Yeah, in most antivirus software have a version for both PC and Mac? Yeah. So for you? If the answer is yes, long ago, we had this little bit of a myth that Max just don't get viruses, you don't need an anti virus, right? Well, partially true. Sort of, I put any virus on my Mac, I, you might want to do that as well. Most companies have a version for both. And I like keeping it consistent, even though the clients will be a little bit different, at least kind of keep it consistent, then you'll have some backup decisions. Mac, Mac Time Machine is fantastic. From my opinion, by the way from a piece of backup local backup software, time machine on the Mac works great. So you need next I would put an external drive in, then go into time machine and set it forget it and it just backs up. It's on Windows, that is a nightmare to backup. Right? For most people. For the average guy on a Mac backing up with Time Machine. That's that's one thing I think the Mac does really, really, really well is that local backup, you know, you get into a file, you mess it up, you're like, Oh, crap, you just jump into Time Machine grab the file from yesterday. It's back done. Super, super cool. Yeah, super cool. So you'll have and then I think once you get down to any virus, and you've got your backups kind of taken care of, then you kind of start figuring out, okay, where do we want to keep files? And this is where for the for podcasters? I think this is important. Because you had said you've got files all over the place, and maybe not the you've done the best file management of them, right?

David Jackson  
Yeah, it's I need to, like, I know, I finally decided for I just called it sentimental stuff I have now in Microsoft OneDrive, I was like, that's gonna be the thing, I do that I have client, like zoom meetings in mediafire. And then I have all my podcast stuff is on an external hard drive to I think it's two terabytes. So that's, that's gonna be the fun one is I will have to move those two terabytes to probably another hardware, I will format a hard drive on the Mac, and then move those files to the McAfee hard drive left,

Jim Collison  
maybe that's gonna be this, this would be a good one to sit down and think about like, where did things want to land. So like that Windows, your old windows computer would make a really good file server. I like the way Windows manages files. I don't like the way Mac manages files. So I would have a drive on that window said you need to change anything, no os change, whatever, just just use Windows. But I wouldn't I would create a network share on there where you kind of keep the files that you want. Yeah. And then I would run the backup software on the windows. By the way, this this may be controversial for some people, but I would run the backup software off Windows To Go wherever I'm going to the cloud. Yeah. So you have time machine covering your daily. Yeah, so Backblaze for you. So time machines covering your daily production stuff, you're moving those production files onto the windows, we'll call it a server, but a Windows box that then moving those files to the cloud. And you got some pretty good backup, then right? You got two local copies and a copy in the cloud. It's you've got kind of storage for it. By the way, that doesn't mean you need to change your media fire, you know, you can still continue to use one drive in media and media fire for it. But it does give you the ability to have one box that's doing all the backup to Backblaze. Because you're doing that today, right? You're using Backblaze. Yeah.

David Jackson  
And that has saved me multiple times, like you said, where you're like, Oh, crap, I deleted that file. No, I emptied the trash. No, you know, anyway. Yeah, it's

Jim Collison  
gone. It's gone forever.

David Jackson  
Neil is saying migrating from a PC to a Mac could be the fruit the perfect time to map a network share to Google Drive. I know some people that love Google Drive and other people that like everything else. You either love it or hate it, you know, so that's always

Jim Collison  
well, I loved his map. You know, perfect time to map a network share. I love this idea of just maybe even documenting. Okay, here's my storage strategy. We have so many files, like we have live files that we create. Okay, this was the live instance that we did then, here's the edit of the audio. Here's the edited video. Here's the video final production. Here's The mp3 You know, I ran this through whatever you run it through. Here's the final mp3. Mike Howard of my good friend passed away a few years ago. I think he kept like nine top for one podcast, like nine copies of things, right? And you're like, dude, do you need that many now, hey, listen, whatever makes you sleep at night, right? That's, that's kind of important. But they this may be a great time to kind of think of a of a not a backup strategy. That's important. But where am I? Do I know where I'm storing everything? And what's my strategy for us? I think every post podcaster could do this during the holidays, little storage audit, like, hey, you know, can I get it back,

David Jackson  
because I have found like you just said, I have from the old, you know, Windows PC, then a folder called My webs. And for whatever reason, when I was using front page, back in the day, I put all my webs in there. So I have stuff there that has. And the only reason I keep those is those also then have the pictures that are on the website and things like that. And I know I have probably three different versions of my webs. And I don't delete any of them. Because I'm always worried. If I delete that. That's the one that had, you know, the old banned photos in it. So I just like app. storage is cheap, who cares, whatever. But it is a pain in the butt when you go to find something that's the problem is when you you have to then look in three places. But yeah, yeah. So

Jim Collison  
well. Hey, Dave, Uncle Marvin, here. This is a long segment, we should probably remind folks what we're doing. So yeah. Can you play the music one more time? Absolutely.

Unknown Speaker  
And now he's been waiting for this. It's time for Jim to get his nerd on.

Jim Collison  
Such a great, this is my this the best day of the year. You got a new computer? I am so geeked out over this.

David Jackson  
And who knows? I don't know how long I bought a year at stream yard. I'll have to sniff it. I know everybody that uses Ecamm, which only works on a Mac loves it. I also know it sounds like there are times that II cam is that kind of thing that does everything. That's the good news is, but now you're like Wait, where's where's the thing where you do the under thing. It's like so it might be might be something that I look into, but it sounds really cool. But the more I hear people talk about it like oh, no, you can do that. But make sure there's always a make sure. It's like oh, yeah, it's cool. It's easy. It's great. It does all this stuff. But just make sure you do this. And that's why that's why I'm so

Jim Collison  
yeah, well, I've learned and I you know, I built a brand new PC that I'm doing for VR, as a matter of fact, that will will show this the VR box just so bad a quest to is in the house, it still is in wrapping as well. We're terrible. We bought this stuff behind me. It's been sitting there the whole time behind me over there's the headset for it. So we'll be setting that up later on this weekend. I think the key on this for podcasters thinking about setting up that that's different than normal, you know, just your kind of your normal PC folks is you you probably have more processes than you think, embedded in the systems that you have. So don't be in a hurry if you get a new computer for Christmas. Dave, I applaud you actually for waiting to set this thing up. You did the right thing. I was a little afraid this week that we'd be doing this call, you know, you're doing this show on the Mac. And I was like, oh, yeah, I don't know how that will go. But wait, take your time.

David Jackson  
That's another thing called experience that, you know, comes along and you go Yeah, I know what's gonna happen when I open that box. And the other thing I thought was really weird. And I guess I'm sure there was a box that I didn't check, because I'm always home. But the UPS guy like set it on my stoop and knocked on the door. And by that I mean he went. I know you can't hear that. But that's the whole point. I mean, I thought somebody might have bumped into the house like it was it was literally like, that was it. And I was like, was that a knock? And I was like, Oh, wait, it's it's because it was supposed to originally show up the 22nd. Today's the 17th he showed up yesterday, so showed up early. And I was like, I wonder if that's it and I see a UPS guy getting back into his truck. And I was like, Man, that's not cool. And I open it up and there's this box and I'm like, that's big enough for a Mac Mini and I opened up I was like, Man, I'm like it's the holiday season. I don't have to worry about my neighborhood too much. But if people are gonna steal stuff now it'd be the time to do it because all the good gifts are showing up now you know, so it'll be interesting to to play with. And I just it's like I said, I started getting a little nervous last night I was up till about one of the morning just going down rabbit hole after rabbit hole. And I was like, You know what, you don't have to make any decisions. Just no, no. And I woke up this morning. It was like, Oh, here's a novel idea. Why not just take one Have your monitors and turn that into the Mac. And then you'll have your PC to do whatever you want and go to town. So, hey, girl, it's

Jim Collison  
good. Good call one more topic. One more on this before we go. And here's the question, what do you do with your old PC right now, you know, I've been, I'm going to try to convince you that you should turn that Windows box into your storage server, so to speak, to use for all your big files. And some of those kinds of things will, that's a unique, like, I need to know what kind of hard drives you have and the setup for those kinds of things. But for many people, they need to recycle their stuff. And this is where it varies by location here in the United States, Best Buy will often take your computer for recycle, and they'll do it gladly. They don't charge you CRTs are different. If you have an old CRT, they're going to charge you 50 bucks or something for that. Make sure you've cleared your hard drive and you've I put a nail through it. If you're gonna turn your hard drive in, I just take literally take it to the workbench, get a nail or a screw, and just drive it right through the hard drive. That'll finish it off pretty well. There's programs you can use, that'll clear it for you and those kinds of things. But

David Jackson  
we're gonna hit the button again. And now.

Unknown Speaker  
It's gonna wait for this. We're gonna consign for Jim to get his nerd.

Jim Collison  
Three at a show.

David Jackson  
I know. Are there any? Are any of those micro mini PCs viable for things like podcast production? You know, the ones about the size of an Apple TV? No. Okay. I know, I heard Adam curry talking about some machine that was like $300. And I was like, yeah, that can't. No, I mean,

Jim Collison  
okay, you could make depending upon your workflow, you can make it work. For some people, they're like, I'm gonna prove it to you that I can do this. You know, don't don't do that spend, you need some. If you're a video, especially if you're a video podcaster for you moving this stuff to YouTube. If you're doing any video, any video via any video, this is more than I've talked to ever in my life. Any video editing at all? You'll you'll need some horsepower on that to get it done in any length of time. So in most cases, if it's audio only, and you have just a few requirements, yeah, you might be able to get away with it. But I wouldn't go the cheap route.

David Jackson  
Yeah. Well, speaking of, you know, talking a lot. I had a weird experience this week. I did a webinar for Libsyn. Which is weird, because when I do a webinar for Lipson, I become Lipson like the words that are coming out of my mouth, are Lipson and I wanted to ask you, I know you've done, you know, a ton of webinars where you're like, you know, Captain gallop, does your mouth go like I mean, I mean, every ounce of spit ran out of my mouth, I would just sitting there and I kind of like, so always have a glass of water near you or something. I, I've never ever had that happen to me. I always have the thing when they speak live, my hands turn whiter than they normally are. And they sweat. But this was like I'm talking and everything's cool. And I'm, I'm trying to channel my inner LC and be kind of like, Hey, thanks for coming on. We're so glad you're here. Blah, blah, blah. And all of a sudden, my, the woman that's the product manager for Lipson studio, started talking and I'm just like, where is like, I'm just like, I've never smoked pot, but I now understand what dry mouth is. Like, holy cow.

Jim Collison  
Yeah, I keep coffee. You know, I keep coffee by the desk all the time, just just for that, but it's good to have a glass of water. Yeah.

David Jackson  
Dan from oh, by the way, Dan. So what do you call it when you have like Kleenex like you are

Jim Collison  
the whatever you're the Yeah, the brand I brand. I watched

David Jackson  
like three minutes of the new Will Smith movie on apple plus, and it comes up and yada yada produced by so and so. And then of course the screen goes black. And then all white letters, it says, Based on a true story. And I was like Dan, Dan, so you are now when I hear horses, I think Glen, and when I see the phrase based on a true story, Dan, you've done a very good job of your branding, that I was like, Ah, it's it's Dan. Dan has been here. Dan will probably be here in the future. I don't know. But it was crazy. So that was that was fun. I have a question for you, Jim. Okay, this is I need I need a second opinion. If you're new to this topic, I am a person that believes the Listen node stats is caca. Poopoo because when you say I'm in the top 2% You're comparing yourself to the show from you know, whatever, 2007 that hasn't put out stuff. And so I was on YouTube and I had a I took the comment offline, because I said dude, you do No, that's, that's a crap stat. And his answer was Why you trying to pee in my Cheerios. You're making it hard to stand out. And so my question is, like I I've always made a list of Um, I've always outed companies like for the longest time Kajabi didn't do 301 redirects now they do. They, by the way, still horrible. I don't want to take this tangent, but they changed the GUID, the unique identifier of every of every episode. That is so bad. But anyway, so this guy. So my question is, do I have no problem outing a company and saying I disagree with what they're doing over here? If I do it to a person, it seems almost like a page out of the curmudgeon manual. You know what I mean? And I was like, shit, because because people are gonna see that as like a feud if it was like a radio feud. And I was like, I don't know if I should, you know,

Jim Collison  
you should just let it go. All right, that was just it's so it's so much easier. Like, listen, I we all have, we all have trouble with this when somebody's I mean, I just got a text message this morning from one of my customers who was like, Hey, have you heard and then there was this, this whole thing that wasn't even true? And you're like, yeah, it just for like, the next half hour? That's all I could think about. Right. And so when you run into those kinds of situations, I would think if there's any, if you have any inkling that it's the wrong, like, if it's 1%, you feel wrong about it, you should listen to the 1% That said, you want to you want to lash out, but just go no, you know, cuz at the end of the day, Dave, I don't think much of this stuff matters. You know, I just, you know, I just don't think it matters.

David Jackson  
Yeah. What, what are you guys see behind the scenes, you're sharing a screen of some sort?

Jim Collison  
Oh, it's just like, that's just my YouTube. Yeah, it's just my YouTube. Okay, no, that's sorry. Sorry, I'll stop sharing.

David Jackson  
You ready for a fun clip. I am not anti advertisement at all. I just worry about In fact, I'm gonna, I'm talking about this in a future episode of the School of podcasting. But there's a study, or I shouldn't even say a study. I it was my study, I did it. But here's the thing with ads in your podcast, let's say that you have a three minute break. Alright, great. So you play three one minute ads. Great. Now, next episode, you still have a three minute break. But instead you put 6/32 ads, it's the same amount of time, your audience is going to be much more perturbed hearing six ads than three. And I was like, That makes so much sense. And I didn't realize it until because it's, you know, the holiday season, I turned on the Hallmark Channel. And I was watching this one movie gym. I don't know if you know the name of it. It's where the really hot Single Girl and the super hot single guy I forget they hate each other at the beginning. And then they they end up finding every

Jim Collison  
other Christmas movie, you mean is that Binu.

David Jackson  
But what was weird is the ads. I kind of liked it in a total like, this is what podcasting does to you. You're like, oh, look, I'm getting ads for mixers, and just things that were much more feminine, not Dallas. Yeah. But it was in it. But there were a ton of ads. And I remember, here's why I think this is true. Is after about two or three ads. I was like, okay, like, let's get back because I gotta find out if she's gonna find the ring in the cake or whatever. And it's just another ad and another ad. So I found that interesting. And on Kevin Schmidlin show, grow the show. He has a radio guy now on his staff. And he said, yeah, that's, that's absolutely true. It's not the time. It's the number of ads. So if you're thinking I know, I did the one little test why I put 15 second ads, seven different times in an episode. And people are like, yeah, don't don't do that. That's because I kept thinking, well, it's only 15 seconds. It's not really interrupting things. So anyway, so that was that I'm going to start this one question from Uncle Mark. But I want to play this because this is what they keep talking about brand safety. And my joke is they're going to turn podcasting and up with people, which was this super brand safe group from the 70s of young people jumping around and being positive and uplifting. So anyway, this is a clip from pod news weekly review, I'll put a link in the show notes at Ask the podcast coach.com/ 419. But they're talking to this company called barometer, and barometer, listens to your show. They do transcripts and all this other stuff. And they're going to kind of give you a grade. But listen to I'm just going to play the color

Unknown Speaker  
challenges for brands that affiliate with a show that may be safe, but the host is not for reasons that happen outside of the show. So we get a sudden emergency email that hosts who are sponsoring was caught wearing a shirt that said something controversial in the wild. And all of a sudden this is a topic. So if you thought that you're only responsible for the show, you are not you are responsible for the behavior of that individual to some people to some stakeholders, and so really important that you get visibility into that as well as what's in the show itself. Wow.

Unknown Speaker  
I mean, other other any examples that that that wearing a shirt can't be a proper example, can it?

Unknown Speaker  
No, that's a real example. Absolutely. Yeah, there was a podcaster who wore a shirt that didn't make any sense to me. Not something I would have recommended that they were but they were wearing it and someone snapped a picture. Somebody put it on the internet and Twitter was ablaze.

David Jackson  
So I heard that and it was like, huh, so I you know, your Northwestern shirt or whatever you have on there, Jim is Northwest. Yeah. Hertzberg is really offensive man from Missouri State. Yes, somebody's gonna put that on Twitter. And it will be of I just when I heard that, I was just like, here we go. And I kind of get it. That's not really new. Because I remember there was somebody on Patreon that got kicked off of Patreon for something she did outside of her show. Which was something like she tried to something with Greenpeace or something. And it was slightly illegal. But I still was kind of like, Yeah, but that's like, let the police throw her in jail. Don't take away our Patreon, but that's just a it's a weird thing. I just wanted to bring it up and go, here's a weird thing. That's that's going to happen. And you can find that weekly dot pod news.net is where you can find that show. But I just who is the who's the British Standard guy? That British guy that is the one and only come on say it with me. I say it every show. James Cridland.

Jim Collison  
I've never heard of him never to see he is He? Is he important. Everybody drink? Come on. Doing things I've never heard. I don't know, got nothing.

David Jackson  
The other thing I thought we could talk about

Jim Collison  
Listen, I am now trying to figure out ways each week to say something on this show that that James Kirtland will put in the newsletter after the PodOmatic incident, and it showed up in the newsletter thought, wait a minute, he listens to ask the podcast coach, maybe I can get maybe I can continue to get shoutouts in his newsletter. Yeah. Assuming I knew who he was.

David Jackson  
Well, Neil has a point here. Now Neil, again, has been in radio forever. And TV, as well. He says I'm surprised that people are surprised by this. You start a podcast, you become a media personality. And brands are super careful about who gets the carry bag. Yeah, I guess my whole point was, I guess I still think of podcasting as an audio thing. But in this case, obviously, if they're taking a picture of insurance, it was on video, YouTube. And I guess I guess my worry is, I could see if I said and I'm just making this up. Let's not go crazy. This is an example off the top. But so if I said, Whatever Polish lives matter, right, the phrase Lives Matter is a lightning bolt. And somebody's gonna go crazy if you wear a shirt that says something like that. So that's my where that person might be. Well, I'm proud of my and I'm not Polish for the record is Polish even the right word. Is it same as mine whole thing just about and they do matter? Yeah. So my whole thing is just offending people because I just heard a great. I'm gonna credit Jerry Seinfeld. He caught it. He flashed paper, something so I'm gonna throw the word personality on that. Because I think some of us have a flash paper personality where we get we there is no you know, zero to 60. There's no 45 in there. It's like we're, it's we're either cool. Or we're enraged. And I was like, huh, so my worry is I'm going to wear a shirt that says Wk ARP, which is on its way, by the way. Thanks to T public. That's excellent. Nice.

Jim Collison  
Great show. Yeah, unless those letters mean,

David Jackson  
the whole thing, but that had Johnny fever. And he was pretty much a misogynist. And you know, the way they depicted Loni Anderson, and I'm like, yeah, it was 1979. All right, let's. So I just I think one of the things I'm going to be interested to see I've got a feeler out is there's a thing called errors and omissions insurance. Because I started looking into this because of the I think we talked about it here about the show, is that a cult did we talk about that? Is that a cult is a show where people would go the Boy Scouts, and I'm just again making this up. I don't know if they did that. But it would be something like the Boy Scouts is this a cult? And they got dropped by their network. They were on like one of the big E Network thingies that you've probably heard of. And that is rumored that maybe they were worried because they started going after big groups and saying, Hey, is that a cult? And apparently not everyone is thrilled when you accuse them of being

Jim Collison  
a cult. No, no. And so it's out there not? Yeah.

David Jackson  
So I was like, huh, and I just wonder if as we again, start thinking about brand safety and worrying about people suing us. You know, our People are gonna start investing in errors and omissions because that's the thing where you go oopsie I didn't mean to say that, did that hurt you? And then you pay 20 bucks. You know,

Jim Collison  
we have automobile insurance, we don't mean to run into people. Right? It's not like, oh, yeah, I think I'm gonna go out today and ran into as many people as they possibly can. Right. So I don't think it's a bad idea to have, like, some insurance for those kinds of reasons. Especially, you know, we're saying things off the cuff. Right, we're saying them instantly. Oftentimes, we're having to react to the things that are going on in the chat room. I'd hesitate to go back and listen to some of our back catalogue episodes. Right. And, you know, yeah, I probably said some things wrong in this business. You know, it might be smart to have some some insurance. I don't mean to say those kinds of things. But sometimes you do. I a gallop, like, I won't do a podcast without either Gallup gear or just plain. Like, I wouldn't wear this hoodie, even though it's supporting the school. I wouldn't I wouldn't do that for Gallup podcasts. Has anybody ever said anything to me about that? No. It's just what I choose to do. I just kind of keep trying to keep the brand now I have enough gear that I just pretty much wear Gallup gear for every single podcast that I do on these, like this one at home gadget geeks. I just tried to wear non controversial stuff. You know, I don't think not sure that Northwest bearkats are going to be controversial this morning or not.

David Jackson  
Who's your arch driver?

Jim Collison  
I don't know. Yeah, that's a good question. I don't know. But they're good. They have a good football and basketball program that my daughter went to school there. So I figured like, I'm okay. But I don't the insurance idea. This may be one of those where you kind of go, Yeah, we have homeowners insurance. We have car insurance. Those are both for accidents, saying something inappropriate or wearing something that it could save. In some cases. That's not intentional. Right. Some cases it is it is absolutely intentional. But in some in some cases. Yeah. By the way, a bear cat's not real. It's a fictitious, I think it's a fictitious mascot. But in you know, in some cases, things just slip out. Right. And so like, that's like in an accident, when you slip on the road, you don't intend to hit the person, but you do. That's why you carry insurance. So I don't think it's such a bad idea.

David Jackson  
Yeah, I haven't. I'll put a link here. I found I googled it and found a thimble, some company that does all sorts of insurance, but they have actually a page. It's like, Are you a podcaster? And I was like, well look at these guys being up to date on everything. So, you know, I don't know that. It's, it's one of the things it's like you you know, you don't need insurance until you need it. So

Jim Collison  
well, most people don't in this case, most people don't, right, the liability you're carrying, because that's what you're that's the that's what you're carrying. Here's liability on this. Did you say something or do something where someone can sue you for actual physical damages? That's what that's the that's kind of what you're insuring there. So

David Jackson  
yeah, there was there was an article that, again, everyone during James Quinlan and pointed out that, yeah, keep

Jim Collison  
mentioning this guy, I have no idea who he is.

David Jackson  
Some out of sports podcast, somebody said something very disparaging about an umpire. And they took the guy to court for who knows what, but he won quite a chunk of change. And I was like, huh, so I need to, I'm sniffing this area of insurance, because I'm just like, All right, we're all you know, with a flash paper, you know, environment, you know, maybe we should do that. So I'll have to

Jim Collison  
Drs. A good question. Right? She says, do the TV news shows have insurance? And I don't know if they do or not, Neil, would they maybe they probably have corporate insurance so that they probably have corporate lawyers. So that's their insurance, right is, is they have lawyers, who you know who they who they cause boy in the news industry. Can you imagine the number of I mean, can you imagine the number of lawsuits? Yeah, it's gotta be

David Jackson  
huge. It's gotta be huge. Yeah, nothing but so. The other thing let's see, how are we going? We're doing on time. Oh, good.

Jim Collison  
Can I get some coffee while you're definitely you're while we're transitioning as soon as there we go.

David Jackson  
Excellent. I'm starting to see remember how we talked about the new crop of podcasters and how we kind of get the same crop and we're not complaining we it's just like look, the kids are coming back you know, the the looms look normal and then loser back.

Jim Collison  
It's freshman. Yeah. From and the

David Jackson  
freshers and so I'm seeing things that I was like Ha so in the theme I'm seeing and I could be wrong. Is I often am is it appears when you first start a podcast, you assume other people are going to promote it. for you, and I'm like, ooh, so one question was, this was from somebody named Steve. This was from a Facebook group, what's the consensus here on fellow podcasters? who reach out to be on your podcast? You know, you're in the same genre, but they don't extend an invite to theirs. Do you take it as an affront? Or do you not care? I'm interested in your thoughts. And I was like, huh, cuz, to me a, if they're in the same job, I guess, on one hand, well, if if that's your, again, this is one of those. It's your podcast, do what you want. But if the only way you let them on your show, is if you let if they let you on their show. I'm like, the one thing I don't hear in that equation is the audience. It's all about me. And so I don't know. Do you have any thoughts on that? Yeah, I

Jim Collison  
don't expect I don't expect to return. Yeah, you know, return, I don't expect them to even advertise for me. You know, let them know, hey, it's available. You know, a lot of my guests on home gadget geeks are already podcasters. They know how to do this. And if they're going to do it, they will. And if they don't, it's okay, the value for me it was in the interview, not in them sharing. I'm not trying to steal their audience. It's great. Oftentimes, they'll mention it or make it they'll make their audience aware of it or whatever, right, we get some. But you know, I have pretty low expectations there. Even with the podcasts we do at Gallup. I have some pretty low expectations for our guests, I kind of see it as my job to do the advertising. And to get that out there. And I'm not there to steal their sheep.

David Jackson  
Yeah. And then it's not one of their we got this one. Again, in a Facebook group from Stephanie. She said, Hi friends, have you ever run into issues where the interview guest is not promoting the episodes on social media, I've had several people on my show, and they didn't post about it or even repost my posts about it. I provided marketing materials to all of them. And still it's crickets, any tips on how you go about asking your guests to promote their interviews? And I politely said, Have you ever thought if you if I asked Jim, the same six questions that he just answered on a previous interview, you know, I always bring up Pat Flynn. And if you're not familiar with Pat Flynn, he was an architect. He lost his job, start his sold ebook, and now he's, you know, a millionaire. And I'm like, everybody that if you stand next to Pat, you're going to hear that story a bazillion times, because it's a great story. But Pat's not going to share that with his newsletter in all of his, you know, primary audience because they've heard the story. You know, Cliff Ravenscraft story of I used to sell insurance. And my dad wanted me to take over the business, but I started upon, okay, we've heard it. So if you've interviewed somebody and walk them through their story, their audiences heard that they're not going to share that again. So I think that's one of the things I don't think people think a lot about, like, Okay, go listen to other people's interviews of that person. Now, I realize that's crazy talk, because, wait, I'm supposed to research the person I'm interviewing, and then see if there's something that you would have asked that they didn't so that the interview is a little bit different. And I know you can do the Larry King I want to come in and I don't want to know who they are at all. So I'm super curious. And again, it's your podcast, do what you want. But I just thought here was again, people are expecting other people to grow the show for them. And I was like,

Jim Collison  
so do you? Well, we we've we've touted that in the Facebook groups and Reddit and all that other stuff is a way to grow your audience. I mean, pod. These people who podcasts about podcasting always say, yeah, a great way to do this is, you know, get on other people's podcasts or have guests have high profile guests on yours, Neil, right. This is Neil, he says, Get that Yeah. Crickets, with interview with interview guests send to happen when they don't bother to build a relationship with that person beyond inviting them to your show. Like, listen, they don't know you. Like oftentimes, exactly. They don't know who you are. Yeah, you had them on the show. You might maybe spend an hour with them. Maybe a pre call of a half an hour. Maybe your interview wasn't very good. Yeah. Like,

David Jackson  
yeah. I don't know how you say that politely like, hey, maybe, you know,

Jim Collison  
maybe you weren't very good in the interview. And they're, they're afraid to to, you know, show it or or, you know, they're afraid to share it with them.

David Jackson  
I was thriving. Here's a classic example. I did an interview kind of swap thing. I will boy, big lesson on that. I don't want to talk about it too publicly, because it's easy to figure out who it is. But their version of our interview, I'm here to tell you where you'll hear me talking and I'm like this, and then all of a sudden in the middle of my answer. Am I going to where I'm like, I I'm in the car and like I can't hear the rest of my answer. And I'm like, surely you hear the volume going up in down. I'm not sending anybody to that interview because it's horrible, not the content. And the person's a very nice person. But I was like, how can it because it's a podcast about podcasting. And it's like, wow, if you are my student, I'd be like, yeah, don't put that out. That's here, run that through our phonic and you're good to go. But I was just like ye. So that's the other thing if it's not a great interview or it's, you know, if you, I forget what it was listening to the other day. And they even said, we'll get the interview in just a minute. And whatever they were talking about was not great. And so nine minutes in, they finally started introducing the person. And I was like, maybe that's why people aren't sharing the interview, because people have to wait to the 27 minute mark to get get to the gas.

Jim Collison  
And we I've been developing a relationship with a thing computers.org podcast that they they're on my show I'm on there's we've been kind of going back and forth, they show up at their live stream, they've shown up at my live stream, like we're building so the audience knows who they are, and, and in their audience knows who I am. And so we spend some time like, you know, kind of working that together. And I'm sure that has brought some folks over. But that's taken more than just a single time. You know, they've been on the show dozens of times at this point. And it's taken a little effort for me to show up to their live streams so that their audience kind of knows who I am from from that standpoint. So I think and I think, Coach da Well, someone said this in chat just a second ago. The relationship matters, right? Yeah. That was just show up. Yeah. Okay. So he's. So the key to this, though I went in, I want to come around is Randy's question. He says, What agency? Would you go through to get a higher profile? Guest? I think there's actually very little value in high profile guests.

David Jackson  
I just do I not how I was,

Jim Collison  
I would not I listen to it. I know that's counterintuitive. And I know everybody's saying go after the big fish. I just don't like that's just not what people are looking for. Especially see brand new podcasters trying to do this where they haven't really honed their skills very well. And then they're going to interview somebody who gets interviewed twice a day all year long. And they're going to fumble through it and it's not going to be great. They're going to think it's great, but it's not going to be great. I just that I'm just not a fit. Now. The the exception to that would be if you're in a niche in that high profile guest is an important influencer in that niche, right. Where, where, from a community standpoint, they're really respected. That could be a different scenario. But for me to get Pat Flynn on home gadget geeks to talk about his gadget setup. Let's say my audience isn't going to know Pat Flynn any more than anybody else. So they'll just go like Pat, he was pretty cool. Yeah, right. They won't do the Pat Flynn, you know, Kennedy. Um, now it's just not gonna work for my audience.

David Jackson  
I took a line from Ben Franklin, I can't remember his original thing. But mine is, it's not the size of the guest that brings the value. It's the size of the value that makes the guest. So I always use the example I remember the first time Glenn Hiebert from the horse Radio Network came on my show, Glenn was, you know, well known in the horse space, but he wasn't known that well, in the podcasting space. He came on and people were like, wait, what? Who is that man? And I was like, exactly. So I don't have applause. But like, Neil, the quote we were looking for is crickets, with interview guests tends to happen when you didn't bother to build a relationship with that person beyond inviting theme to be on your show. What do you think David Lee Roth? Exactly. So

Jim Collison  
yeah, is this and there's always exceptions to this. So you know, somebody's gonna come out of the woodworks and say, Oh, no, Jim. That's not true. I did. Well, that's you're the one in 99. In a lot of cases, it just now, if that if if interviewing a high profile guest is your dream? Yeah. And that's something that's going to add value to what you do. And it's just been like, Oh, I've always wanted to interview fill in the blank. Right. Do it?

David Jackson  
Well, the other thing I could see it doing is when you get that one high profile person, it does make it easier to get other guests. Yeah. Because you can say, you know, here's my show, we talked about such and such, I'd love to have you come on the show in the past, we've interviewed people like Malala. And they go, Oh, if so and so has been on the show. I should be on there too. So I could see that. But in terms of hiring an agency, here's my problem. I have agencies contact me daily with pitches that are so bad, that if I had somebody that said, Hey, Dave, I listened to this episode, you talked about this. My client does this, and I think they'd be great if you ever want to talk About blank, I go look at that agency and go, Wait a minute, I might hire them to represent me. I've never never had that done. And the only time somebody did it, all they did was copy the first few sentences of my blog post and put it in and make it look like they listened. And my favorite was, it was really cool. That the guy there client that was trying to get on my show actually recorded a personalized video for me. And I was like, Hey, Dave, want to say, thanks. Here's who I am bla bla bla, and I really love the show. And then he said the wrong name. And I was, Oh, so close. I did email him. And he's actually going to be on the show. He wrote a book. He's all about mindset. But I was like, I love the effort. It just that's not my show. So I thought that was pretty funny. So

Jim Collison  
the the trick to that, so to answer Randy's question, Randy is there in the chat about where can I go? If you and he gives a little clarification. He says I've basically a comedy already in the show information entertainment type podcast. So if you're looking for entertainers, or comedians, and you're going high profile, you're going to have to go through their agents. And so you're gonna have to know somebody who knows somebody on this, this is not a look him up in the phone book, the phone book is here, the phone book is here, that it's not that situation, you're gonna have to go through some booking agents to get that done. You know, as an example, if you wanted to get Brian Regan on your podcast, or Jim Gaffigan, to comedians that I just really like, yeah, you're gonna have to work through their agents to get them, you're probably going to have to pay for them. And your, your chances of getting all the way there are pretty slim. So for the big, big names, you're gonna have to go through their agents to get that done. You can go you know, there's plenty of podcasts connect as a podcasts connect or podcast connector. There's a bunch of subscription, a couple,

David Jackson  
it's podcast, singular, guests plural podcast. guest.com. Or if you go to podcasting resources.com There's a bunch of them listed over there. The one thing you can do if you're trying to get, you know, celebrities, is make a list before you spend the money of people you would love to have on your show. And then sign up for IMDb Pro for a month. And you can get the information for again for their agents and go that route. Or, you know, ping them on Twitter. I mean, Troy Heinrichs from the you know, he's all involved with the blacklist exposed. And it happened by sending a tweet to one of the writers, you know, and that eventually got him in there. So that's, that's so you're gonna

Jim Collison  
have to be persistent on this if you're gonna want to get through to the to the I just Michael Hyatt I tried to get on our Galat podcast at one point, it was four or five months of emails back and forth. And then at one point I had Michael booked and a week before they're like, oh, actually Michael's busy. Can I get you to one of his you know, we've got Dave who's just as good and nothing no, I wanted Michael Hyatt that's why we did this right. He had talked about Clifton Strengths and their organization uses Clifton Strengths. So you're gonna have to be persistent, you're gonna have to be patient, you're gonna get bumped kind of based on how big of a deal You Are. Chances are you'll get bumped. Scoble was another Robert Scoble was another one I interviewed back in the day. And and man his that that dude at the time was so busy getting his time was next to impossible. And I got bumped down the road a couple of times on that one. So you get ready for that to happen to

David Jackson  
Well, that happens. I mean, I feel Neil's in the chat room. And originally we were set up to interview Neil today. And then I forgot that Christmas is this weekend. And so I had to cancel that deal if you're available by the way sent you an email yesterday, because Christmas has now been moved to Sunday. So I'm available on Saturday but I said I realized your weakens probably booked but don't get too The only time I ever get slightly upset is if somebody bumps me twice. And that's when you kind of like alright what's you know, but again like you said if it's a Robert Scoble there is not Robert what's I forget who the guy is Robert? Yeah.

Jim Collison  
Robert Scoble. Yeah, you got it. Cool. And then Michael Michael Hyatt

David Jackson  
Yeah, so but you know who would never bump us are awesome awesome supporters. That's it. And I want to do something different today and see if I can do this are awesome supporters of course are at Ask the podcast coach.com/awesome And I looked this morning and that's interesting getting hit with a giant popup screen are awesome supportive for today is in we've talked about him in the past and he's also I'm now I don't know if I'm an official co host, but I'm on here a lot. This is Greg from the indie drop in network. This is the guy again, if you're looking if you have a scary Go or true crime, you can basically go over and put your show on this network and it'll help you. You know, here's the podcasting Power Hour. Speaking of that, I'm now on that on a regular basis. It's a Monday night. What do you call the live Twitter thing? Tweet twit. Twit stream, twit something. Yeah, spaces. It's a Twitter spaces.

Jim Collison  
So Twitter still is it's still there.

David Jackson  
It's still there. It's hard to believe.

Jim Collison  
I know. There's some people worried about it.

David Jackson  
Yeah. But anyway, Greg has a bunch of stuff over there at Indy dropping.com. And he's one of our awesome supporters. So Greg, thanks for your support. And I need to stop sharing my screen. Here it is down at the bottom. That's the topics we can pick from in case and because that secret info now our secrets. So you'll just see where here's, here's the question that I just read. This is podcasters. Oh, I forget the name of this program. Studio. That is also changing the way they do business. And I didn't want to do that I wanted to do this and go to this page, cause Hey, I ask the podcast coach runs on pod page, if you want a tripod page, tripod page.com. And if you want more Jim Collison and pay, who doesn't go to the average guy.tv Check out home gadget geeks. And when you think podcasting, think school of podcasting and of course, if you'd like to have Dave in your pocket, go to Dave in your pocket.com It's a new coaching without calendar thing I'm doing. And of course, everything is at Ask the podcast coach.com/support. So thanks to all of our awesome supporters for, you know, not making us hate life while we're editing and all the other work we put into this. So let's see, we have an argument going on in the chat room while I was gone. I see where we're okay, so we have I know higher profile guests would want to do a smaller podcast. That's not true. Because they know they are using you to help your podcast, it doesn't help them as much. Now, I don't know if you would call the drummer from Ozzy or the bass player from Ozzy big names, they were to my my audience, they're like holy cow, you got Carmine a piece that was like, yeah, he came on my show in 2006. So to say it was now at the time, it was probably one of 100 podcast, so it was easier to be a big fish out there. But Neil is saying, if they, if they want to something that will be worth their time, in most cases, networks and PR people are more concerned about metrics if they are in fact, here's a good question on this. I had a podcast, I don't know, what do you want to call a manager? What is I don't want to step on Dr. But there's there's different things where it's they kind of do everything for you. But they were coming to me for free, which again, whatever. And that's what this is. And they want to know, how do I know? Who are the most popular shows? Because there's when we can't see everybody's stats? And I'm like, well, there's Apple podcast ads, but that's not a popular that's, that's who's trending now. You can go to a charitable. And again, that's kind of who's trending now. And she's like, Well, how do you know what show to go on? I go, I look at the content and go, Yes, I can help that audience. I go, I don't really, look I've never asked in fact, I started saying no to the smaller shows, because in some cases, I would be interviewed and it would never go live. That was annoying. But on the other hand, I said I don't do interviews, I said I do interviews for two things, to help their audience and to start a relationship with that person. I said, because I know me at least three times that I've been like Episode Three on a show that never made it to Episode 10. But that person remembers that I came on their show, when they had no listens, no downloads, and I came on episode three. So the the fact that I came on. Again, I didn't get a lot of downloads from that. But I got a relationship from people that then later when somebody says, hey, like, I see you have a podcast, where should I go to learn to like, oh, Dave is the nicest guy you gotta go to Dave. So there are two reasons for that. So I personally don't look at numbers. And when I when I see somebody asked me how many downloads Do you have? They're not here to serve my audience. They're here to serve them. And that's not always a great fit for content in some ways. So what do you think Jim? On this whole like, I should only go on big shows.

Jim Collison  
I think do what you want. Like there are Listen, there's some strategic things that you can do to kind of help kind of think through Yeah, this will help. You just never know though. Like you never know. But you going both ways one being on shows like, you never know that little show. You know, I've done some first episode maybe in the first 10 with some podcasters. You know, and you kind of thinking, Well, you know this, is this worth my time? Yeah, it is because people are worth my time. So, for me, I'll give I'll be on anybody's show. I don't mind. But I've had some I mean, I was talking about this in the chat room. I've had some high profile guests on home gadget geeks before they were high profile. Yeah. So Jamie seminoff, founder of ring, which sold to Amazon. He's a gajillion air at this point. So you know, ring doorbells, those kinds of things. Yeah, he came on home gadget geeks. They weren't part of Amazon yet. But he came on he thought it was valuable to come out. We had a great conversation had a great relationship with Him. Mark, the CEO of Zapier, which has become a big, you know, a fairly big player in this space. They came on i This was years ago now, but and got to know him super nice guy. We had a great conversation about Zapier. I've since asked him back and I get nothing. Like that's one of those things I probably haven't tried with Jamie Siminoff. Just because I know, I don't know, maybe I should try.

David Jackson  
Well, maybe I should try. Dan says you never know who will agree to be on your show until you ask.

Jim Collison  
It's always it's always gonna be a no if you don't ask. Yeah, right. And

David Jackson  
realize no is not always no, it's not now. I mean, I know Pat Flynn, I asked him probably three times before he came on the show. And he kept having kids. And I was like, what are your priorities? What do you mean, my wife's gonna have a baby come on the show. But when he had a product, he had a plugin for podcasters. I was like, Ah, he has something to promote. So that's another thing if you're going after big people, wait till they have a movie or a book or whatever it is they're doing. So then they'll they might come on. Nielsen is famous people enjoy good conversations, period. Many of them could care less about your numbers be interested in worth their time. Yeah. To me, it's all about, you know, do you fit my audience? And can you bring value and that's really all I'm looking for. So

Jim Collison  
yeah, you never know, I've had wines, Agent crew from wine spies on my show that, you know, they're fairly large flash sale, you know, wine company that use this cool locker technology to be able to, you know, they, they sell these bottles, move them into a locker, and then when the lockers full, they'll ship them to you for free. You know, he didn't have to come on my show. It wasn't a direct tie. We had the best time he was super cool. And we just had a good time talking about wine and technology and some of those kinds of things out in California, the fires, you know, some of those kinds of things that they have to So. Yeah, I mean, I would ask, it never hurts to

David Jackson  
know, you know, it's like, yeah, and then you can say,

Unknown Speaker  
Good. Go ahead. Sorry. Well,

David Jackson  
I feel like no, you know, you first know your first. But you can always ask them when they say no, you can even ask them. Is that a not now or a you don't think you're a good fit? Yeah. Because they might come back and say, yeah, now, you know, just to keep the conversation going.

Jim Collison  
Yeah, you never you never know. But set your expectations accordingly. Like don't get you know, just because you get turned down by, you know, let's say you ask Joe Rogan to be on your podcast, and then he they give you they never you never get an email response back. Don't? Don't take it personally. Nobody.

David Jackson  
Exactly. I guess we'll go here. Dr. has a question. And that is what about John Lee Dumas charging an arm or leg for his appearance? Keep in mind, John has a large audience. And chances are the person that wants to charge maybe not so much. So that's a that's a great experiment in capitalism and supply and demand. So John was getting like, I can't imagine the insane number of pitches he was getting to be on the show. So yeah, how do you how do you slow that down? Go? Well, if you want to be on the show, here's the fee. So that would slow that down and bring that so I think that's the biggest reason he did that would be my guess. Now, I have already voiced to me, I think that's a really slippery slope for people that aren't JLD. Because what happens is you start charging people, whatever $300. And then Susie gets new braces and you get the pool that you've been waiting on and all sudden that extra $300 That you had is now not extra, you need it. And now you have to have a guest pay you 300 bucks, and you'll take anybody with a pulse as long as they got 300 bucks that because what happens is people are paying to be in front of your audience. And if you let anybody get in front of your audience, the audience is going to leave. So that's that's my biggest worry about it. And I'm always a big fan of like, look you you're bringing value You know, I don't think you need to pay you're you're paying me in value is kind of how I see it. But I, I know lots of people differ on that opinion. So. But that's my thoughts on it. Let me go back to the thing we were looking at early, or here's one that I thought was interesting. Again, kind of the whole, maybe we just need to do the work. I've been sitting back reading and thinking of starting a podcast for the last three years. And I'm here to tell you, if that is you, you're not alone. I've known a few people that have done that. But I'm not sure if my topic is something that is needed or not. Five years ago, I also first of all, if I just stopped there, Jim, what would you say?

Jim Collison  
If my topic is needed or not, yeah, to that. Well, I have what's your audience? Think? Yeah. What kind of feedback are you getting? Yep, stuff. Yeah.

David Jackson  
He says five years ago, I found myself starting over in my late 40s. After my 23 year marriage fell apart. I'm thinking of doing my podcast on starting over all of that, the ups and downs, the struggles and hard times, and what I did rebuild my life. That's a cool story. So what does everyone think is this type of podcast needed? And so my question is, are there other people in their 40s that have gone through a divorce? And we're starting over? I think the answer that is probably probably people in the 30s, and their 50s, and whatever. So the nice thing about that, is if somebody hears that, and they're like, crap, I'm you know, now I've got this weird thing at Christmas, where we've got to do Christmas two Christmases with the kids because they gotta go to their moms, and then they're going to come over to me and bam, my man, it's a hassle, and I don't know what to do. And then you hear somebody else is going through the same thing. You're like, oh, yeah, I'm not, you know, I'm not the only one going through that. And that can be huge. You know, for that, so. But my thing, I answered him, and I said, What's your why? I said, because usually, the podcasters I see that really enjoy it and have fun, are people that aren't thinking about doing it, it's, I need to do this, I need to get this information out. People need to know this. People need to hear this. And it's that passion that pushes them through the first couple of years. That comes in handy. So I just heard that and that was my my knee jerk without knowing this person at all was maybe you shouldn't start a podcast, I encouraged him. I'm like, Look, people will listen to that. But I didn't hear the the I need to get this out kind of thing. But no thoughts, Jim on that.

Jim Collison  
Yeah, no, I 100% agree with you on that. I think, you know, when I started blogging back before podcasting, in one of the very first blogs, I wrote to myself, I don't care if anybody even reads these, I do them for me. And I think some of those kinds of podcasts, where it's, it's, it's personal, in nature, whatever, life hacks, whatever, you know, you're going to have a niche in there. And it's going to keep it fairly small anyways, in the motivation, almost needs to be free. Like you said for you first, if you attract some listeners, and you do a good job, and you market it well, and it picks up some steam. Now, there may be some some things out there for you. But I think setting those again, getting those expectations set right from the very beginning is important. Well,

David Jackson  
Dr. Dre asked a good question. But what if he asked it differently? Maybe he's really saying, can I compete with all other podcasts out there? Of the 40 year old starting over? And the answer is can you? Yes, will you? I mean, think about it right now. There if we go back five years ago, and somebody's in college, and they're like, I don't know if I should go pro or not. I mean, I'm never going to compete with Tom Brady. He's the greatest of all time. I shouldn't shoot me. No, I'm not gonna go pro whatever. I can't compete. Well, Tom Brady's gonna eventually retire for good.

Jim Collison  
Now he's gonna be a robot, robot parts. How can I throw the football today,

David Jackson  
but if the only reason you're getting in, is to be the best of all, 40 year old starting over podcasts. That's a great goal. But just realize it's not going to come from your guest sharing your show. And you know, all the things we talked about were like, We want other people to do this for us. It's like it takes a lot of work. So and again, can you compete realize it's a competition? But and that's where the more you niche down in some cases, like hey, you just cut out your competition because now you're doing it for 40 year old men, not just 40 year olds, it's 40 year old men. Then Then if you you know however you want to do it, but if somebody to me, I don't know. I mean, look, I want to be the best website to learn podcasting, but I In the woods, what I did this year, I doubled down on the people that have decided I want to learn from Dave. And that's when I said, Look, unlimited consulting, I'm going to smother the people that have decided to go with me. And if that then makes me if they go tell friends, that hey, you got to go learn from Dave, maybe I will eventually become the number one place. But I, I just know that everybody in their brothers teaching podcasting and if I think about that, I'll I'll just curl up in a ball and go, there's too much competition. Now, I'm not gonna think about that. I'm going to focus on the people who are focusing on me and in that then grows, so it's no

Jim Collison  
and will you maybe, what are the chances you won't? Yes, yeah. How will you know? You try? Yeah, um, you know, give it a try.

David Jackson  
I always use the analogy, like, what about a writer or an actor or an athlete, or musician? You know, we all start off to be, you know, the top. Some of them make it I mean, the one thing I watched the Bruce, I watched the Bruce Springsteen, interview on Howard Stern, you know, Howard, and I'm going to tell a story about my dad motorcycles. But he said he was on stage. And he goes to my left was Mick Jagger. And to my right was George Harrison. And he said, I thought to myself, of all the kids that picked up a guitar, and all the kids that eventually joined a band, and of all the kids and he just kept going, that got a record deal that God played and did a day. He goes, I don't know why it's me. He goes out on a but you know, he goes, I just eat this situation was just right for him. Right. It's like, I just know, I worked really hard. And he was talking about all the weird gigs he did.

Jim Collison  
Where he didn't quit, either. Yeah, that's it. I mean, think about his career in the 70s. It could have been over in the 70s. And he reinvented himself in the 80s. And listen, he I just heard it on an album with the band that my daughter listens to that's like, the, you know, there are a bunch of kids. And there's Bruce Springsteen doing a doing a song with them. Right. And you think he's doing it again, you know? And he works hard, though. Yeah, works

David Jackson  
hard. Well, and the other thing he did, he finally had to quit doing it because they would like have to shut down the interstate. He had a big Halloween party. And people in New Jersey would just like, like, he goes, we went over like a couple 1000. And they're like, You got to start getting a permit for this or something. And he just had to shut it down. But it was all about again, building that community. So I personally, it's funny, that I bring him up. I have read his book. I've seen his Broadway special. I've listened to it. I just don't get Bruce Springsteen. I don't he's just not my thing. And realize that's maybe that's a good point. You can be the boss and they're still gonna people like Go, man, he's all right. He's okay. My favorite you know, so

Jim Collison  
you're not you're not going to be the favorite for everybody. And you're gonna get emails telling you that and you gotta go well, okay, you're not our target. You're not my target. You're not You're not one of my people. You know, Tuesday night I went out I went out in the shed and enjoyed a candle and then to my audience in discord I was like, Hey, I'm out I'm out hanging out if you want to if you want to join me on stream yard do this not recorded, you know, in a cup Ed Sullivan jumped in there he was he's dead was in Miami this week. They jumped in a randy Walker, one of my listeners jumped in. You never know like, and this was an opportunity to meet one on one with these folks. And you got to take some time to do it. And I never would have met Randy any other way than doing this and sometimes you just have to take a chance and open some things up.

David Jackson  
Well, you ready for here's here's a fun. This came out from remember the guys that were on Pacific something something Dan Meisner is his name. Oh, that's not actually the thing I want to talk about. But this is a link. You know, the worst day to publish a podcast you want to get out of the seven days?

Jim Collison  
I don't know. Sunday afternoons,

David Jackson  
you would think no, it's it's the one we publish on. Jim. We That's right. We're the worst day to publish a podcast is Saturday. And so this is a thing came out from pod chaser. And which I believe is owned by a Cast now if I remember right, that's correct. Yeah. So they have all sorts of information and they've came in here. And you can go in so I guess I kind of consider like at the School of podcasting is kind of a technology podcast. But you can go in here. You know, what's the best day to public? I think Wednesday and Thursdays.

Jim Collison  
Wait a minute here any FAQs, read that read that statement? Because it doesn't say it's the worst day it says it's the least popular day we go so maybe we're maybe we're doing the right thing because we're not competing with the million of other podcasts that come out during the week. So I mean, saw how you read it. If it's all how you read it. Yeah. survey questions matter,

David Jackson  
but you can you can download the report. Was that website again? A gallup.com There you go. But you can download the report there. I heard somebody talking about this. And they said the the best days are Wednesday and Thursday. But here's my here's my answer to this question. What's the best day to publish your podcast? The one you can do consistently? It's really I think, more I don't know if I move this show to Wednesday that all of a sudden be like, because that then turns into the proverbial golden switch. Right? Where you're like, oh, that's, that's it? I got 10,000 downloads. What do you do I switch to Wednesday? I don't know that. That's the because again, I don't know about you. I listen to show that are months old. It's not like, you know, it's, yeah, so just one of those.

Jim Collison  
I think it largely doesn't matter. Yeah. Publish when it's convenient for you. If you think there's a day that brings you success, publish it on that day. It's fine. You're gonna be just fine with it. I think we're okay. I think we're okay. Publishing on Saturday.

David Jackson  
Yeah. Here's a quick question from the chat. I have a road caster one. And two, do you think that renting office space, which when I did, it was 200 bucks a month for other people to buy time to do podcasting themselves? I know people that do it. I've know people that are successful at it. And I've known a few that we're not, because you have to either a make it really cheap. Because if you think about it, if you charge me 50 bucks, and I do 10 episodes, I could have bought my own road caster, you know, at least a one. And you typically have to target small businesses that have a budget that can use this as a tax write off. So is it a viable business option? I don't know. We had a Wendy's close. I mean, that's a viable business option, but it was in a horrible location in the help was horrible. I don't know. It's, like I said, some people are doing it. You know, if I was in New York City, maybe. But if I'm in, you know, beaver mud, Mississippi, maybe not? I don't know. What do you think

Jim Collison  
it depends on the situation, right? I think if we if you're in a situation where maybe you don't have a good studio in your home, and you have to rent some space, you did this for a while. Yeah. And that allows itself like, Hey, I've got all this equipment, Why not rent this equipment? Well, in that case, it takes maybe one or two to make it worth it. Like, if you're going into it from just a small business perspective, you got to crunch the numbers in your location and kind of know how many podcasters you have. And who would be willing to pay those numbers are going to be pretty small. So you got to do the math on that. But if you're going to use it anyway, why not rent that out to others, and make a little extra cash on the end? That could work that way? If that was something you were already using?

David Jackson  
For sure. Yeah, that's That's it. Neil asked isn't staples doing this. I know, they were Matthew PASI at the podcast. consultant.com Because somebody else owns podcasts. consultant.com was the guy that actually helped staples do that. I don't know that they're still doing it. I know, those pop up. I know, here in Akron, the Akron Public Library had a podcast room, but it was all glass. So here again, maybe someone should have had somebody with a little experience. I know. Barrel, huh? Something barrel in Kentucky, Jen, something see this is yeah, this crash and burn here. But she does editing and she does. I think you can come in to use their studio. There was a guy in Detroit that was doing it. You know, so some people have had success. But it's one of the things where this is not a hey, if I open it up and put podcast here on a window. The it's not a given, you're gonna have to market it, you know? And then you have to figure out are you doing that? Are you delivering a finished episode file? Or do you just give them that? Because here's the thing. I mean, I can buy a microphone for $58. I think this is on sale for right now the Samsung cue to you. And, you know, I've done if I'm just doing a solo show, it's just a matter of you have to find people that are afraid of technology and have a budget basically. So the Kim says the one library in another kind of suburb of Akron called Cuyahoga Falls has a video stage. So that's fun. Does. Do you know, this is the gar authority model happen often because that's the same thing.

Jim Collison  
Yeah, they have a studio Dave built Dave gras flow built a studio, they rent that out. They have a lot of folks who come in, listen to that model works because Dave Garoppolo is an amazing business guy. Like he is a hustler. He works seven days a week. He's always thinking about new ways to do things. They've hustled that studio. I don't know the numbers on that study. I don't know if it's profitable or not. It probably is for what they do. He needed it in anyways, this is one of those situations where he needed that studio anyways. And they're all using it, like you build this gigantic studio for what to podcast. You know the scar authority and Nashville's. Okay? Why not rent it out? And yeah, you're gonna have to pay a producer to come in and help produce those Dave doesn't do that work he pays somebody to do that. The podcasters who pay are basically paying for a producer and some time in their and their time in the shop and in the studio. So could it work? Yeah, totally. There's he's doing it. He's making it. That's one of those situations where like, I was gonna do it anyway. So we might as well make some money off of it while we're doing it. And Dave Garoppolo is an amazing business guy. He misses no opportunities, takes huge risks, and misses no opportunities.

David Jackson  
Yeah, the I said 58. It was $58. The cue to you it's up to 69, which is still a little less than I think they were selling it for, but it's, but you hit it though, it is kind of a risk. The one thing that blew me away is when I had my office, because I just wanted to separate work from home, is I want to get the internet because I'm like, Oh, it's a business, but it's a side hustle, you know, and they wouldn't know your business and your internet isn't $60 a month now it's 200. And I was like, wait, what? So? Yeah, I put a link in the description there. If you go to support the show, support this show.com/q2 You that'll take you right over to Sweetwater uncle Meyer says several studios, by me priced at $35 An hour or $225 an hour with a two hour minimum. That's just to record and realize take 70% of that. And that's the price because 30% of that goes to Uncle Sam. Yep. So it's, I don't want to say it's not a viable thing. It's just it's a business, you're gonna have to, you know, work it and hustle it and that whole nine yards and have a little bit of runway money in the bank. And, you know, cross your fingers and say a prayer and put sign out see what happens. So yeah, so we'll, we'll leave it with that. It's 12 o'clock already. Are we doing a show on Christmas Eve?

Jim Collison  
Yes. Yeah. That'd be fun. Are you Are you okay with it?

David Jackson  
I'm okay with it. I will bring my dad ahead. I think I have a Santa hat in the basement. So

Jim Collison  
do you have some I do have a Santa hat. Yeah, that'll be well, we'll do that. Maybe some follow up to the Mac. Oh, yeah. By

David Jackson  
then we'll have a show. Yeah, we'll

Jim Collison  
do some follow up. Yeah, but so.

David Jackson  
But, Jim, any ideas what's coming up on the average? guy.tv at home gadget geeks?

Jim Collison  
Yeah. Aaron Lawrence from tech gadgets. canada.com joins me we spend some time talking about coffee makers, espresso coffee makers delicious. The ember mug? We spent some time with a Samsung projector like Is it viable in 2022 to have a projector and Amazon TV fire cube. So if you're interested in those, any of those four things and Aaron's just fantastic home gadget geeks.com

David Jackson  
Yeah, Uncle Marv says he's going to be out of town next week going into the in laws. So for everybody who can't make it next week. Have a safe and happy

Jim Collison  
we'll record it will record it for you. It will be here monka Marva. It'll be there. We'll hit the record

David Jackson  
button. Yeah, on the school of podcasting. I'm talking about, oddly enough making decisions. And just, again, I'm trying to help people that are overthinking it, because I was overthinking it. And kind of how I came to that decision. And I saved myself $1,000 By asking myself two questions. And I'll tell you what, those are on the school of podcasting because they're looking back and like, wow, that was close. I almost want you to have to go listen to it to know it was telling me right now. It doesn't even exist yet. So, okay, but it'll be out on Monday. That's one of the that's one of the parts of the School of podcasting. So, thanks for everybody for showing up. If we don't see you next week, have a safe and happy holiday. And we're always here every Saturday, ask the podcast coach.com/live and ask the podcast coach.com/support For those that want to throw us a few shingles so and be sure to hit the thumbs up button and the like button so we'll see you next Saturday. And subscribe right now. Hit the button.